Kepler's Events Coming Soon

Kepler's events are FREE to the public unless otherwise noted. 

To request a signed copy of the book from any in-store event, please click HERE   


 

 

 

 EAT, DRINK, TALK AND SWAP BOOKS: An Evening at Kepler's

Saturday, March 7, 6:30 - 9:00 p.m.

If you're interested in spending an evening with fun, smart, creative and lit-minded souls, Kepler's has put together an event for you: a Book Swap. If not tempted by the good company and great atmosphere, be tempted by delicious food and free-flowing wine. Bring a book you love, one you can talk about all night and are willing to part with at the end of the evening.

You'll go home with a book highly recommended by another BookSwapper, a free Advanced Reader's Edition of a book from Kepler's, and some great suggestions to add to your never-ending 'Must Read' list. There are also rumors of surprise giveaways.

AND THAT'S NOT ALL! Because we're featuring ELIZABETH ROSNER with her novel Electric City. Yes, Elizabeth will be joining us to discuss her book about which Booklist said "Rosner's richly imagined historical novel richly conveys an abiding sense of time and place. A deeply evocative paean to the wonders of science, the perils of technology, and the sacrifices of people in thrall to their power."

Come at 6:30 to mingle over drinks and munchies. We'll start the book discussions at 7pm and we'll wrap up the Book Swap festivities around 9pm.

Tickets are $25 and are now on sale in the store or from Brown Paper Tickets.

"Think cocktail party, with a bookish twist." - Litquake


Credit: Daniel Portnoy

 

 

 

PREMIER EVENT: Dave Barry

Tuesday, March 10, 7:30 p.m.

Live Right and Find Happiness (Although Beer Is Much Faster): Life Lessons from Dave Barry

Tickets are available at Kepler's and online at Brown Paper Tickets


Ready to laugh so loud you'll fall out of your chair?

During the course of living (mumble, mumble) years, Dave Barry has learned much of wisdom,* (*actual wisdom not guaranteed) and he is eager to pass it on—to the next generation, the generation after that, and, you get the idea...

In brilliant, brand-new, never-before-published pieces, Dave passes on home truths to his new grandson and to his daughter Sophie, who will be getting her learner’s permit in 2015. (“So you’re about to start driving! How exciting! I’m going to kill myself”). He explores the hometown of his youth, where the grown-ups were supposed to be uptight 50s' conformists but seemed to have a lot of un–Mad Men–like fun—unlike Dave’s own Baby Boomer generation, which was supposed to be wild and crazy, but somehow turned into neurotic hover-parents.

Dave Barry has been a professional humorist ever since he discovered that professional humor was a lot easier than working. He has won the Pulitzer Prize for commentary (one of Barry's columns was largely responsible for the movement to observe International Talk Like a Pirate Day every year on September 19). In addition, he has written more than 30 books, including the novels Big Trouble, Lunatics, Tricky Business and, most recently, Insane City. He has also written a number of books with titles like I'll Mature When I'm Dead, which are technically classified as nonfiction, although they contain numerous lies.


Credit: Peter van Agtmael

 

Elliott Ackerman in conversation with Anthony Marra

Thursday, March 12, 7:30 p.m.

Green on Blue


"Harrowing, brutal, and utterly absorbing... Ackerman has spun a morally complex tale of revenge, loyalty, and brotherly love." -Khaled Hosseini, author of The Kite Runner

Aziz and his older brother Ali are coming of age in a village amid the pine forests and endless mountains of eastern Afghanistan. There is no school, but their mother teaches them to read and write, and once a month sends the boys on a two-day journey to the bazaar. They are poor, but inside their mud-walled home, the family has stability, love, and routine. When a convoy of armed men arrives in their village one day, their world crumbles...

Elliot Ackerman served five tours of duty in Iraq and Afghanistan and is the recipient of the Silver Star, the Bronze Star for valor and the Purple Heart. A former White House Fellow, his essays and fiction have appeared in The New Yorker, The Atlantic, The New Republic, and Ecotone, among others. He currently lives in Istanbul where he writes on the Syrian Civil War.

Anthony Marra is the winner of a Whiting Award, Pushcart Prize, and the Narrative Prize. A Constellation of Vital Phenomena won the National Book Critics Circle's inaugural John Leonard Prize and the Anisfield-Wolf Book Award in fiction, as well as the inaugural Carla Furstenberg Cohen Fiction Award. He received an MFA from the Iowa Writers' Workshop and was a Stegner Fellow at Stanford, where he is the Jones Lecturer in Fiction.



 

 

 

PREMIER EVENT: Michael Gazzaniga in conversation with Angie Coiro

Wednesday, March 18, 7:30pm

Tales from Both Sides of the Brain: A Life in Neuroscience

Tickets are available at Kepler's and online at Brown Paper Tickets

 

"The story of how science works interwoven with the life of a brilliant scientist who not only created an entire new field of inquiry but just happened to live in the Animal House at Dartmouth. A marvelous, exciting adventure, elegantly written." -Daniel J. Levitin, author of This Is Your Brain on Music and The Organized Mind.

Join us for an exploration into the intersection of Michael Gazzaniga's scientific achievements and his reflections on the challenges and thrills of working as a scientist. In the mid-twentieth century, Gazzaniga, "the father of cognitive neuroscience," was part of a team of pioneering neuroscientists who developed the now foundational split-brain brain theory: the notion that the right and left hemispheres of the brain can act independently from one another and have different strengths.

Including a foreword by Steven Pinker, Tales from Both Sides of the Brain tells the impassioned story of Gazzaniga's life in science and his decades-long journey to understand how the separate spheres of our brains communicate and miscommunicate with their separate agendas.

Gazzaniga is internationally recognized in the field of neuroscience and a pioneer in cognitive research. He is the director of the SAGE Center for the Study of the Mind at UC Santa Barbara and the author of many popular science books. He is a prominent adviser to various institutes involved in brain research, a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and a past president of the American Psychological Society. He is featured regularly on public television and his research has been presented on NBC Nightly News and the Today show.

Angie Coiro is an award-winning journalist and interviewer, host of the syndicated In Deep radio show. Her work has aired nationally on Mother Jones Radio on Air America, and on public radio. Bay Area audiences know her from Live From the Left Coast/The Angie Coiro Show; KCSM-TV’s “Spotlight!”; KQED's Friday Forum; KGO radio; and for many years of news and traffic reporting around the dial. Angie co-founded the Tech Connects interview series at The Tech Museum of San Jose, currently in its second year.



Credit: Star Black

 

 

 

 

 

PREMIER EVENT: Joyce Carol Oates in conversation with Michelle Richmond

Wednesday, March 25, 7:30pm

The Sacrifice

Tickets are available at Kepler's and online at Brown Paper Tickets

Student tickets are available! 

 

Don't miss an evening with one of our most revered literary masters, New York Times bestselling author Joyce Carol Oates and her new incendiary novel, The Sacrifice. This major work of fiction illuminates the tragic impact of sexual violence, racism, brutality, and power on innocent lives and probes the persistence of stereotypes, the nature of revenge, the complexities of truth, and our insatiable hunger for sensationalism.

When a 14-year-old girl is the alleged victim of a terrible act of racial violence, the incident shocks and galvanizes her community, exacerbating the racial tension that has been simmering in this New Jersey town for decades. Oates explores the uneasy fault lines in a racially troubled society. In such a tense, charged atmosphere, Oates reveals that there must always be a sacrifice—of innocence, truth, trust, and, ultimately, of lives. Unfolding in a succession of multiracial voices, in a community transfixed by this alleged crime and the spectacle unfolding around it, this profound novel exposes what—and who—the “sacrifice” actually is, and what consequences these kind of events hold for us all.

As the chorus of its voices—from the police to the media to the victim and her family—reaches a crescendo, The Sacrifice offers a shocking new understanding of power and oppression, innocence and guilt, truth and sensationalism, justice and retribution. 

Joyce Carol Oates is the author of more than 70 books, including novels, short story collections, poetry volumes, plays, essays, and criticism, including the national bestseller We Were the Mulvaneys. Among her many honors are the PEN/Malamud Award for Excellence in Short Fiction and the National Book Award. Oates is the Roger S. Berlind Distinguished Professor of the Humanities at Princeton University, and has been a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters since 1978.

Michelle Richmond is the New York Times bestselling author of four novels, including Golden State and The Year of Fog, and two story collections, including Hum, winner of the Catherine Doctorow Innovative Fiction Prize. She is the founder and publisher of Fiction Attic Press.



Credit: Michael Lionstar
 
 

 

Jane Hirshfield

Tuesday, March 31, 7:30 p.m.

The Beauty: Poems

Ten Windows: How Great Poems Transform the World

 

Celebrate National Poetry Month and the ever-expanding importance of poetry with a stunning new collection of verse (The Beauty), paired with the publication of Ten Windows, Jane's new collection of essays that discusses what poems mean and why they move us. A wonderful book for anyone who has ever wondered why poetry matters, reluctant readers of poetry, or those people who have already found beauty and meaning in poetry on their own.

Jane's new collection of poetry opens with a series of poems in which Hirshfield uses the familiar materials of the self to explore the profundities and quirks of existence. Through her poetry we enter into a higher understanding of ourselves and of the small beauties we so often miss

Jane Hirshfield is the author of seven previous collections of poetry, two books of essays, and four books collecting and co-translating the work of poets from the past. A current chancellor of the Academy of American Poets, Hirshfield has received many prizes and awards including fellowships from the Guggenheim and Rockefeller foundations and the National Endowment for the Arts. She has been featured on two Bill Moyers PBS television specials and her work appears frequently on Garrison Keillor's Writer's Almanac and other public radio programs.


APRIL EVENTS


Credit: Michael Halsband

 

 

 

PREMIER EVENT: Barney Frank

Wednesday, April 1, 7:30pm

Frank: A Life in Politics from the Great Society to Same-Sex Marriage

Fox Theatre, 2215 Broadway Street, Redwood City

Tickets are available at Kepler's and online at Fox Theatre Box Office

Join us for an unforgettable evening with America's smartest, feistiest, and funniest politician, Barney Frank. In Frank's candid and witty political memoir, Frank: A Life in Politics from the Great Society to Same-Sex Marriage, we find out how a disheveled, intellectually combative gay Jew with a trademark New Jersey-Massachusetts accent, became one of the most powerful and effective members of Congress.

In Frank, he chronicles his lifelong struggle against inequality, which culminated in co-writing the most significant Wall Street regulations since the Great Depression. Barney Frank continues to be an important voice for economic fairness at a time when many of the regulations he authored are being challenged.

With his trademark directness and insight, Frank explores the emotional toll of living in the closet and how he became the first member of Congress to voluntarily disclose his homosexuality. He also details the favors, grudges, and fears that shape a legislator's career. 

We can't wait to hear Frank's legendary rhetorical skills in action and to spend an evening with the person who led the debate on some of the most significant issues of our time.

Barney Frank represented the Fourth Congressional District of Massachusetts for nearly five decades, and chaired the House Financial Services Committee from 2007 to 2013. He is the first member of congress to enter a same-sex marriage while serving in office.



Credit: Jeff Cottenden

 

 

PREMIER EVENT: Kazuo Ishiguro

Thursday, April 2, 7:30 p.m.

The Buried Giant

Menlo-Atherton High School Center for Performing Arts, 555 Middlefield Rd., Atherton  

Tickets are available at Kepler's and online at Brown Paper Tickets

Student tickets are available! 


Join us for a very special evening with Kazuo Ishiguro, one of the most celebrated contemporary fiction writers in the English-speaking world. We’ll be celebrating the release of The Buried Giant, Kauzo Ishiguro's first novel in nearly a decade, following international bestsellers Never Let Me Go and The Remains of the Day.

We were lucky enough to receive some Advanced Reader Copies of the novel, and we have to say that we love the book, and so much of our enjoyment of it stemmed from the less you know the better. Meaning, we don't want to give anything away here. Not yet. Not until you've had a chance to read it yourself. All the publisher will say about the book is that it is "sometimes savage, often intensely moving," and is about "lost memories, love, revenge and war."

We can tell you that this new novel is like nothing he has ever written. It is an adventure fable that integrates a familiar ancient British civilization tale with a fantastical element. And all of the familiar trademarks of Ishiguro are present: his expert prose, his characters' search for meaning, an exploration of the limitations of memory, and Ishiguro's incredibly vast imagination.

Called an original and remarkable genius by the New York Times, Ishiguro is the author of Never Let Me Go and The Remains of the Day, both of which were adapted into highly acclaimed films. He has received four Man Booker Prize nominations, was ranked 32nd on the New York Times list of "The 50 greatest British writers since 1945," was awarded the Giuseppe Tomasi di Lampedusa International Literary Prize, and received an OBE for Services to Literary and in 1998 the French decoration of Chevalier de L'Orde des Arts et des Lettres. Born in Nagasaki, Japan in 1954, Ishiguro moved to Britain at the age of 5.


 

 

 


PREMIER EVENT: Jacqueline Winspear

Monday, April 6, 7:30pm

A Dangerous Place: A Maisie Dobbs Novel

Tickets are available at Kepler's and online at Brown Paper Tickets

 

When Jacqueline visited us in July of 2014, she announced the upcoming publication of the newest book in the Maisie Dobbs series. We are so pleased to announce that we will be celebrating the release of it with a reading by Jacqueline only two days after the publication date.

Spring 1937. In the four years since she left England, Maisie Dobbs has experienced love, contentment, stability and the deepest tragedy a woman can endure. Now, all she wants is the peace she believes she might find by returning to India. But her sojourn is cut short when her stepmother summons her home to England; her aging father Frankie Dobbs is not getting any younger.

But on a ship bound for England, Maisie realizes she isn't ready to return, so she disembarks in Gibraltar. Days after Maisie's arrival, a photographer and member of Gibraltar's Sephardic Jewish community, Sebastian Babayoff, is murdered, and Maisie becomes entangled in the case, drawing the attention of the British Secret Service. Under the suspicious eye of a British agent, Maisie is pulled deeper into political intrigue and renews an uneasy acquaintance in the process. At a crossroads between her past and her future, Maisie must choose a direction, knowing that England is, for her, an equally dangerous place, but in quite a different way.

Jacqueline has won numerous awards, including the Agatha Award for Best Novel, and since An Incomplete Revenge was published in 2008, each of her novels has been an instant New York Times and National Bestseller.


Credit: Elena Seibert
 

Launch: Ann Packer

Tuesday, April 7, 7:30 p.m. 

The Children's Crusade


From the New York Times bestselling, award-winning author of The Dive from Clausen’s Pier comes a masterful new novel that explores the secrets and desires, the remnant wounds and saving graces of one California family over the course of five decades. Ann Packer has an incredible eye for detail and is genius at evoking an era with such faithfulness. In addition, you will identify with and deeply care for her characters in her most deeply affecting book yet.

Bill Blair finds the land by accident, three wooded acres south of San Francisco. The year is 1954, long before anyone will call this area Silicon Valley. Struck by a vision of the family he might create there, Bill buys the property and proposes to Penny Greenway, a woman whose yearning attitude toward life appeals to him. In less than a decade, they have four children. Yet Penny is a mercurial housewife, overwhelmed and under-satisfied at a time when women chafed at the conventions confining them. And Penny will sacrifice anything – her marriage, her children – to become an artist.

Years later, the three oldest Blair children, adults now and still living near the family home, are disrupted by the return of the youngest, whose sudden presence and troubles force a reckoning with their history and set off a struggle over the future.  

Ann Packer is the acclaimed author of two collections of short fiction and two bestselling novels, Songs Without Words and The Dive from Clausen’s Pier, which received the Kate Chopin Literary Award, among many other prizes and honors.




 

Bruce Henderson

Thursday, April 9, 7:30 p.m.

Rescue at Los Baños: The Most Daring Prison Camp Raid of World War II

 

From the bestselling author of Hero Found comes the incredible true story of one of the greatest military rescues of all time, the 1945 World War II prison camp raid at Los Baños in the Philippines. Combining personal interviews, diaries, correspondence, memoirs, and archival research, Rescue at Los Baños tells the story of a remarkable group of prisoners—whose courage and fortitude helped them overcome hardship, deprivation, and cruelty—and of the young American soldiers and Filipino guerrillas who risked their lives to save them.

In February 1945, as the U.S. victory in the Pacific drew nearer, the Japanese army grew desperate, and its soldiers guarding U.S. and Allied POWs more sadistic. Starved, shot and beaten, many of the 2,146 prisoners of the Los Baños prison camp in the Philippines—most of them American men, women and children—would not survive much longer unless rescued soon.

Deeply concerned about the half-starved and ill-treated prisoners, General Douglas MacArthur assigned to the 11th Airborne Division a dangerous rescue mission deep behind enemy lines that became a deadly race against the clock. The Los Baños raid would become one of the greatest triumphs of that war or any war; hailed years later by Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, General Colin Powell: “I doubt that any airborne unit in the world will ever be able to rival the Los Baños prison raid. It is the textbook operation for all ages and all armies.”

Bruce Henderson is the author or coauthor of more than twenty nonfiction books, including the #1 New York Times bestseller And the Sea Will Tell (with Vincent Bugliosi) and Down to the Sea. A former newspaper and magazine writer, Henderson has taught nonfiction writing at several major universities.



Credit: Benjamin Benschneider


 

 

 

PREMIER EVENT: Erik Larson

Monday, April 13, 7:30pm

Dead Wake: The Last Crossing of the Lusitania 

Tickets are available at Kepler's and online at Brown Paper Tickets


On the 100th anniversary of the Lusitania disaster, comes the enthralling story of the sinking ship from Erik Larson.

On May 1, 1915, a luxury ocean liner as richly appointed as an English country house sailed out of New York, bound for Liverpool, carrying a record number of children and infants. The passengers were anxious. Germany had declared the seas around Britain to be a war zone, and for months, its U-boats had brought terror to the North Atlantic. But the Lusitania was one of the era's great transatlantic "Greyhounds" and her captain, William Thomas Turner, placed tremendous faith in the gentlemanly strictures of warfare that for a century had kept civilian ships safe from attack. He knew, moreover, that his ship--the fastest then in service--could outrun any threat.

Germany, however, was determined to change the rules of the game, and Walther Schwieger, the captain of Unterseeboot-20, was happy to oblige. Meanwhile, an ultra-secret British intelligence unit tracked Schwieger's U-boat, but told no one. As U-20 and the Lusitania made their way toward Liverpool, an array of forces both grand and achingly small--hubris, a chance fog, a closely guarded secret, and more--all converged to produce one of the great disasters of history. 

It is a story that many of us think we know but don't, and Erik Larson tells it thrillingly, switching between hunter and hunted while painting a larger portrait of America at the height of the Progressive Era. Full of glamour, mystery, and real-life suspense, Dead Wake brings to life a cast of evocative characters, from famed Boston bookseller Charles Lauriat to pioneering female architect Theodate Pope Riddle to President Wilson, a man lost to grief, dreading the widening war but also captivated by the prospect of new love. Gripping and important, Dead Wake captures the sheer drama and emotional power of a disaster that helped place America on the road to war.

Erik Larson is the author of four national bestsellers: In the Garden of Beasts, Thunderstruck, The Devil in the White City, and Isaac's Storm, which have collectively sold more than 5.5 million copies. His books have been published in fourteen countries.



 
 
 

 

Skip Horack

Wednesday, April 15, 7:30 p.m.

The Other Joseph

 

We're excited to introduce you to Skip Horack who is emerging as a novelist in full command of his craft. In The Other Joseph he masterfully depicts a life driven off the rails by tragedy and sin —a man now summoned by the legacy of a beloved, lost brother to embark on a journey in search of understanding, happiness, and redemption. The New York Times Book Review hailed Skip's writing as, “…luminous, clean prose… He has a poet’s tuned attentiveness.”

After years of trying, Laurie and Alan are thrilled to find out that they'll finally be having a baby, until they discover the unthinkable: the doctor has impregnated Laurie with the wrong man's "donation."  

Haunted by the disappearance of his older brother Tommy in the first Gulf War, the tragic deaths of his parents, and the felony conviction that has branded him for a decade, Roy Joseph has labored in lonesome exile—and under the ever-watchful eyes of the law—moving between oil rigs off the coast of Louisiana and an Airstream trailer he shares with his dog.

Then, on the cusp of his thirtieth birthday, Roy is contacted by a teenage girl from California claiming to be his lost brother’s biological daughter. Yearning for connection and the prospect of family, Roy embarks on a journey across America, visiting childhood haunts in the South to confront his troubled memories and history, and making a stop in Nevada to call on a retired Navy SEAL who may hold the answer to Tommy’s fate. The ultimate destination is San Francisco, where a potential Russian bride and his long-lost niece await, and Roy may finally recover the Joseph line.

Skip Horak is a former Jones Lecturer at Stanford University, where he was also a Wallace Stegner Fellow. His story collection The Southern Cross won the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference Bakeless Fiction Prize, and his novel The Eden Hunter was a New York Times Book Review Editors’ Choice. A native of Louisiana, he is currently an assistant professor at Florida State University.


Credit: Kris Krüg
 

 

Beth Shapiro

Thursday, April 16, 7:30 p.m.

How to Clone a Mammoth: The Science of de-Extinction

 

The astonishing and controversial process of de-extinction makes possible bringing extinct species, like mammoths and passenger pigeons, back to life. Once seen as science fiction, the very real and compelling science behind de-extinction redefines conservation's future. Beth Shapiro, evolutionary biologist and pioneer in "ancient DNA" research, vividly explores the extraordinary cutting-edge science that is being used today to resurrect the past - from deciding which species should be restored, to sequencing their genomes, to anticipating how revived populations might be overseen in the wild.

Along with practical benefits, Shapiro explores de-extinctions ethical challenges, using her own research, including her travels to Siberian locales in search of ice age bones, as well as those of fellow experts such as Svante Paabo, George Church, and Craig Venter. Using DNA collected from remains as a genetic blueprint, scientists aim to engineer extinct traits--traits that evolved by natural selections over thousands of years--into living organisms. But rather than viewing de-extinction as a way to restore one particular species, Shapiro argues that the overarching goal should be the revitalization and stabilization of contemporary ecosystems. For example, elephants with genes modified to express mammoth traits could expand into the Arctic, re-establishing lost productivity to the tundra ecosystem.

Beth Shapiro is associate professor of ecology and evolutionary biology at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Her work has appeared in numerous publications, including Nature and Science, and she was a 2009 recipient of a MacArthur Award.



 
 

 

Jennifer Jacquet

Tuesday, April 21, 7:30 p.m.

Is Shame Necessary?: New Uses for an Old Tool

 

"In the age of Anthony Weiner and Miley Cyrus, shame seems an antiquated concept--a quaint tool of conformity-obsessed collectivist societies, replete with scarlet letters and loss of face. In this thought-provoking, wonderfully readable book, Jennifer Jacquet explores the psychology and sociology of shame. In the process, she argues that shaming is far from obsolete, and can be an effective weapon wielded by the weak against the strong." -Robert Sapolsky, author of Monkeyluv.

In our culture of individuality, guilt is advertised as the cornerstone of conscience. Yet while guilt holds individuals to personal standards, it seems impotent in the face of corrupt corporate policies. In recent years, we have been asked to assuage our guilt about these problems as consumers, by buying organic foods or fair trade products, for example. But does the impact of individual consumer consciousness make a difference or is it too microscopic?

Jacquet persuasively argues that the solution to the limitations of guilt can be found in shame, retrofitted for the age of democracy and social media. She demonstrates how shaming can function as a nonviolent form of resistance that, in turn, challenges institutions, organizations, and even governments to actuate large-scale change. She argues that when applied in the right way, the right quantity, and at the right time, shame has the capacity to keep us from failing other species in life's fabric and, ultimately, ourselves.

“Shame is no longer unfashionable, thanks to Jennifer Jacquet. This book describes, in sparkling prose, how important a sense of shame is to civilized life, and provides some fascinating insights as to the role of social media in providing a new tool to moderate shameless behavior.” - Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, author of Flow

Jennifer Jacquet is an assistant professor in the Department of Environmental Studies at New York University. She works at the intersection of conservation and cooperation.



 

 

 

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LAUNCH: Sabaa Tahir

Tuesday, April 28, 7:30 p.m.

An Ember in the Ashes

 

Please join us as we host a very special launch party for local author, Sabaa Tahir.

"I was so engrossed with this book that I missed a connecting flight. If that doesn't convince you to read An Ember in the Ashes, I don't know what will. An explosive, heartbreaking, epic debut that will keep you glued to the pages." –Marie Lu, New York Times bestselling author of Legend

Set in a terrifyingly brutal Rome-like world, An Ember in the Ashes is an epic fantasy debut about an orphan fighting for her family and a soldier fighting for his freedom. It’s a story that’s literally burning to be told.

Laia is a Scholar living under the iron-fisted rule of the Martial Empire. When her brother is arrested for treason, Laia goes undercover as a slave at the empire’s greatest military academy in exchange for assistance from rebel Scholars who claim that they will help to save her brother from execution. Elias is the academy’s finest soldier— and secretly, its most unwilling. Elias is considering deserting the military, but before he can, he’s ordered to participate in a ruthless contest to choose the next Martial emperor. When their paths cross at the academy, they find that their destinies are more intertwined than either could have imagined and that their choices will change the future of the empire itself.

Sabaa will be in conversation with Evelyn Skye.


MAY EVENTS


Credit: Elena Seibert
 
 
 

 

Jane Smiley

Tuesday, May 5, 7:30 p.m.

Early Warning

 

Pulitzer Prize winning author Jane Smiley brings us the second volume in The Last Hundred Years trilogy, which started with Some Luck, long-listed for the National Book award. Come help us celebrate the publication of Early Warning, the book that chronicles the Langdon's family journey through mid-century America.

Early Warning opens in 1953 with the Langdons at a crossroads. Without spoiling it for those of you who haven't read Some Luck, the five Langdon children are left looking to the future. One remains to work the Iowa farm, while the others scatter to Washington, DC, California, and everywhere in between.

The Langdon children then have children of their own: twin boys who are best friends and vicious rivals; a girl whose rebellious spirit takes her to the notorious Peoples Temple in San Francisco; and a golden boy who drops out of college to fight in Vietnam—leaving behind a secret legacy that will send shockwaves through the Langdon family into the next generation.

The book captures an indelible period in America - the Cold War, the social and sexual revolutions of the 1960s and '70s, and the unprecedented wealth of the early '80s - through the lens of richly drawn characters we come to know and love.

Jane Smiley is the author of numerous novels, including A Thousand Acres, which was awarded the Pulitzer Prize. A member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters, she has also received the PEN USA Lifetime Achievement Award for Literature.